MEGHAN McCAIN: And Just Like That . . . Sex and the City died of wokeness

One of the things that has always made The Golden Girls a classic TV show is that it featured a group of women, living together and talking about anything and everything – from sex and relationships to life and family.

But most importantly, they had a lot of fun, and as a result, the audience had a lot of fun with them.

If that’s the case with misleaders, wake up from the “Sex and the City” reboot.

Let me preface what I will say next – I am so sad to feel that way about the renaissance, aptly called “And Just Like That…”.

I’m a millennial – 37 to be exact.

The original HBO show reached the height of its popularity, popularity, and cultural significance when I was approaching my formative years and while at Columbia University in New York City.

Not the same thing: the show was a true cultural phenomenon and for many reasons we should be forever grateful for the hurdles it broke in terms of open conversations about women and sexuality

I can’t fully express what it was like doing a show about women, friendships, relationships, and individual mobility in modern America — and yes, sex — on air at that time in my life.

The show was a true cultural phenomenon and for many reasons we should be forever grateful for the barriers it broke in terms of open conversations about women and sexuality.

It embodied the transcendence of time and freedom of pre-awakening before the 2008 financial crisis.

Any reboot of this cultural touchstone would have very high expectations, but I didn’t expect to be frustrated and depressed at the same time, after watching the first two episodes.

For a start, it didn’t quite advance much from the original show, though groundbreaking at the time, as it did to many other shows of the era. I can watch The Sopranos over and over and have quite a few criticisms of the series.

But a lot of the promises of “Sex and the City” turned out to be entirely fictional and lacking any connection to reality.

The show portrayed its main character, Carrie Bradshaw, as a columnist, living in a gorgeous Manhattan apartment, able to purchase a closet full of designer clothes and shoes.

She also finds the idea of ​​marriage and children disgusting – to put it mildly.

Now, I don’t think all TV should fully reflect life, but I do think that for a certain generation of women this show made some false promises about sex and intimacy that now seem outdated and don’t reflect what real life is both in New York City and beyond. .

As I got older, I was horrified by the messages sent to so many young women and wished for more realism and nuance when it came to intimacy and relationships with men.

But I digress – back to the reboot.

Sarah Jessica Parker is an iconic and still gorgeous actress who embodies the character of Carrie.

Any reboot of this cultural touchstone would have very high expectations, but I didn't expect to be frustrated and depressed at the same time, after watching the first two episodes.

Any reboot of this cultural touchstone would have very high expectations, but I didn’t expect to be frustrated and depressed at the same time, after watching the first two episodes.

The problem with the new series lies in the clumsy attempt to reformat the show to the periods of vigilance and puritanism in which we live.

For example, Carrie now plays the “gender compatible woman” on a podcast with younger hosts.

One of them is – of course – strange and non-binary. Because it’s so boring and unsophisticated to be a straight white woman.

I don’t know who to blame, the writers of the series, or this stupid and oppressive time we are living in.

The first time I heard about anal sex or vibrators it was on this show – now whole lines dedicated to micro-turbines.

Meghan says new HBO Max is simply a 'misleading, woke-up to Sex and the City' reboot

Meghan says new HBO Max is simply a ‘misleading, woke-up to Sex and the City’ reboot

Miranda, played by Cynthia Nixon, appears as inadvertently racist and old when she expresses shock at her college professor’s hairstyle.

When you try to clean up your mess, it only gets worse.

‘A law professor can’t have hair like mine?’ why is that?’ The straight educator asks.

Miranda starts to chatter.

My comment had absolutely nothing to do with it being a black hairstyle. I knew you were black when you signed up for this class. That was important to me,” she walks around, as the camera pans across the shocked faces of the other students.

“Did I sign up for this class because I’m black?” The professor responds in a hypothetical harsh manner.

It gets rougher from there. But the point is – Miranda is hopeless.

It’s almost as if the show is derailed to say that every generation Xer from their ‘Sex and the City’ past is a problem and needs a modern make up.

“And Just Like…” also introduces some new faces – just like that.

The supporting actors exhibit commendable racial diversity and identity, but we don’t learn much about their characters.

It is almost as if it were written in script to satisfy computer censorship.

Uh – you think?

There is a way to carry out important cultural messages without feeling like they are being force-feeding, and this show – unfortunately – really fails at that.

You’ve been superficially shoved down your throat to make a point about the ‘evolution’ of rich white liberal women in the political climate of 2021.

Much like the fallacies I find in modern liberalism in big cities, these characters seem to include the absurdity of some progressive, awakened white women.

I can’t sum it up better than a New York Times review that noted that “the entire production looks as if it quickly reads How to Be Anti-Racist in June of 2020”.

Above all, and most importantly, it’s not fun at all. Not even a little.

Not even fashion, which looks more like a masquerade than the frivolity of the original show.

Sarah Jessica Parker is an iconic and still gorgeous actress who embodies Carrie (pictured with actor Chris Noth) who plays Mr. Big.

Sarah Jessica Parker is an iconic and still gorgeous actress who embodies Carrie (pictured with actor Chris Noth) who plays Mr. Big.

It’s so bleak and (spoiler alert), the sudden death of Mr. Page on Peloton in the first episode, followed by his funeral, is deeply frustrating and confusing.

The only logical way (and I can only guess) is that it was written into the script to kill whatever was left of the original that we loved so we could fully move on to this new chapter of modern misery.

Which is unfortunate because the only reason I’m sitting here to write this or choose to watch the show was because of how much I love the original.

The show was also heavily affected by the absence of Kim Cattrall as Samantha Jones, who has always been my favorite character on the show.

I think it could have brought in some lost wit and, dare I say, even some jokes that there was very little to it in the first two episodes.

There’s also no sex at all, except for a story about Miranda’s teenage son and girlfriend, which I don’t think anyone wants to see or hear.

It’s embarrassing, clumsy, and disgusting to hear a mother joke about her child’s sex life over breakfast and lunch.

Another spoiler warning: Miranda steps barefoot on the condom her son uses.

I’m not big on reruns in general and I’m always grateful to shows like Seinfeld, who resisted the urge to make a huge comeback. Some things are really meant to be cultural moments in time and to stay there.

We are living in one of the most oppressive and anti-free speech moments in the modern era. There is palpable paranoia in our art and comedy. It’s clear that shows and actors (with a few glaring exceptions like Dave Chapelle) worry about upsetting the wrong people, being politically incorrect or not progressive enough.

This is not a way to create fun or impactful entertainment.

Wokeness kills everything, and I am disappointed to tell you that And Just Like That is another victim of Hollywood trying to please a particular audience rather than the original one, which made it a hit in the first place.

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